Grant funding for music therapy

Old school hip hop songs

Rappers from late 90s early 2000s

Don’t rely on audio repair and noise reduction software to solve all your problems. These soundproofing hacks will help you reduce noise right at the source!

While the PR-40 looks like a traditional condenser mic, it’s actually a dynamic microphone, which makes it an excellent choice for podcasting. Dynamic microphones are less sensitive than condenser microphones and capture less ambient noise. The PR-40’s fixed cardioid pickup pattern further helps reduce background noise for a crystal-clear broadcast. With an internal shock mount, the PR-40 is fully protected from handling noise, while the dual mesh filters prevent plosives. An extended frequency range helps capture that classic “radio voice” sound.

Ethan Hein is a Doctoral Fellow in Music Education at New York University. He teaches music technology, production and education at NYU and Montclair State University. With the NYU Music Experience Design Lab, Ethan has taken a leadership role in the creation of new technologies for learning and expression, most notably the Groove Pizza. He is the instructor of the free Soundfly course series called Theory for Producers. He maintains a widely-followed and influential blog, and has written for various publications, including Slate, Quartz, and NewMusicBox.

Curatorial grants

It absolutely could make “lazy” DJs better selectors, however, that is not our focus. We want to help people become better listeners and help them identify and understand the music they actually love, so they can confidently find more of it.

+ Work 1:1 with a Soundfly Mentor with the Headliner’s Club, our month-long personalized learning program, and develop a plan to achieve your goals with the help of a professional musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran! What would you like to improve?

“Happier”: Wait, no… what are you… no! Not the dog, come on, man, not the dog, what are you doing to me, Marshmello? Okay, so here’s a form I’m not adequately equipped to categorize or compare to anything else: what’s stumping me is what to do with the three-bar space in between the pre-chorus and the solid chorus/refrain that’s introduced at the beginning. For now, I’m lumping it in with the chorus as part of a chorus variation. But you could also think of it as an extended part of the pre-chorus, especially as its lyric is taken from it. Or, I guess we could even call it an “interlude.” It’s slippery. I have to highlight the half-bridge that ends the song — you almost never see half-bridges.

Personally, I’ll be going with C major, because of two small details. First, the song ends on a C chord, which gives us a clue as to how the writer hears the song. Next, Halsey is singing “blue notes” from the C blues scale, which is something you can trust. But because the melody notes and loop notes make an A minor chord in first inversion, you could also hear that as an Am chord, and so an A minor tonality.

It’s right there in the title — you’ll be able to make music in Logic Pro X! By the end of this course, you’ll be comfortable writing and editing complete tracks in Logic, and starting to get your mixes sounding awesome in a rough state.

Music charities to donate to

Plus, holy crap, they gave Bieber his own entire verse this time! He grew up so fast. Seriously, though, it’s really cool how all of the verses in this song are completely distinct from one another, yet still follow an 8+4 construction.

The main chord progression of this tune features an A♭ major chord for two beats of the first measure, C minor for the last two beats of that first measure (falls on beat three), and B♭ major for an entire bar, repeating over and over and… over. Using the image above, you can now analyze this progression as IV major, VI minor, and V major.

I’m not sure if it’s interesting or anti-interesting that our meter chart matches almost exactly with last year’s, at thirty-seven 4/4s, two 12/8s, and instead of the uncommon gatling gun 24/16, we found a somewhat-rare-in-its-own-right 2/4 meter.

“Bad at Love”: Just like the song Halsey sang last year with the Chainsmokers, “Closer,” this song defies a concrete tonal center, camping on what I first heard as the IV and V chords, with just a flirtation to the I chord at the end of the loop. It’s subjective as to how anyone’s ear is going to hear this tonally, at least at first. It’s like that famous “Rabbit-Duck” illusion where some people see a rabbit and others see a duck.

We all know that sound is a wave. The curves and spikes of our friend the “waveform” are a graphic representation of that wave’s action, traveling physically through air. If I clap my hands and record it into my DAW, the peaks and troughs on the screen represent the fluctuating changes in air pressure that cause the sensory phenomenon we call sound. These ripples of pressure in the air make our eardrums vibrate, so we can hear that sound.