Grant funding for music therapy

Old school hip hop songs

National endowment for the arts purpose

Major platforms like Spotify, Pandora, and Apple Music have begun rolling out robust dashboards for artists to not only track and analyze how your songs are performing, but also to provide you with invaluable streaming data that can help you understand who your audience is, where to tour, how to most effectively spend your marketing dollars, and much more.

One particularly interesting thing to point out here is that very last green bar — “One Loopers.” That’s not actually a reference to the form, but it’s related to it. It means that more than half of the 40 songs we looked at that topped the Billboard charts in 2018 were based off of just a single loop that continued for the entire track. In those cases, the different sections were delineated less by harmonic changes or big structural differences but instead by the melody, the instrumentation, or both.

Another option for struggling songwriters is a private advance company. These companies offer advances to songwriters who have a threshold amount of annual royalty income with the promise of returning their rights when the advance is repaid. However, this type of loan typically comes with high interest rates and stiff penalties for non-payment. This can lead to many financial problems in the future and saddle the songwriter with debt for many years.

Early 2000s rappers

If you’re looking for an easy way to post show information in one place and have it show up all over the internet, look no further than Songkick’s Tourbox API feature. It functions through a widget that you can add to your website and across your social media accounts, as well as a mass automated updater that reaches Spotify, Shazam, Bandcamp, Pandora, Hype Machine, and loads of other sites. Fans with the Songkick app installed on their phones will receive notifications when you announce shows near their location.

“To B, or not to B.” That is… not a question this year, because none of our songs were in the key of B! It was E♭— minor, specifically — that was our huge winner this year (black keys on the piano in general, really), with low showings for the keys of D and E, once again proving that nobody writes Top 40 pop songs on their guitars anymore.

Let’s use my own childhood as an example. I heard a few too many nursery rhymes from my crib, like “Mary Had a Little Lamb” and “Merrily We Roll Along.” Songs that focus on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd scale degrees, small intervalic jumps, feel more familiar, more comfortable, and more nostalgic, to me at least.

Student-Artist: Emily McCullough

Does the solitary fact that Once Upon a Time in Shaolin eschews all forms of distribution and mass-listenability effectively set it apart from its counterparts? I’m not sure the answer is yes, but I would argue that it’s at least a very good step in that direction.

Music scholarships for high school seniors

If you play two notes at a time, they will be connected by an orange line. If you play three or more notes at a time, they will form an orange shape. These geometric visualizations are meant to support and complement your aural understanding of intervals and chords, the way that they do with rhythms on the Groove Pizza.

One particularly interesting thing to point out here is that very last green bar — “One Loopers.” That’s not actually a reference to the form, but it’s related to it. It means that more than half of the 40 songs we looked at that topped the Billboard charts in 2018 were based off of just a single loop that continued for the entire track. In those cases, the different sections were delineated less by harmonic changes or big structural differences but instead by the melody, the instrumentation, or both.

In a perfect world, your numbers year to year should be pretty consistent, which will put them at ease. Unfortunately, that’s rarely the case with 1099 contractors (especially artists, songwriters, etc.). There’s great years, good years, and bad years. That’s just the way it is.

Ethan Hein is a Doctoral Fellow in Music Education at New York University. He teaches music technology, production and education at NYU and Montclair State University. With the NYU Music Experience Design Lab, Ethan has taken a leadership role in the creation of new technologies for learning and expression, most notably the Groove Pizza. He is the instructor of the free Soundfly course series called Theory for Producers. He maintains a widely-followed and influential blog, and has written for various publications, including Slate, Quartz, and NewMusicBox.

Even if you’re not a huge fan of Ali Farka Touré or other West African musicians, you’ve still probably seen one at a friend’s house or in an attic somewhere — or heard them on a Ben Harper song. Or maybe you even have one yourself that your weird aunt got you for Hannukah one year. Well, hopefully we can help you dust it off and give it a new life.