Grant funding for music therapy

Old school hip hop songs

Most gangster rappers

The reverse crash cymbal technique is one of the most common impact accentuators. Some producers prefer imitating this sound with automated white noise samples fading in, or a reversed tambourine sample instead of a reversed crash cymbal. Either way, that whooshing sound leading up to the chorus can be so easily overlooked, but it’s one of those sound effects you’d miss if it wasn’t there.

Write down exactly what you hope to accomplish during a session and include all the relevant steps or sub-goals. For example, if your main goal is to record “Song A,” get specific about what you need to do in order to get it all done in the most manageable way. From laying down a scratch track in the demo phase to knowing when in the production process to add ornamental sound design elements, chart out the steps so you don’t end up wasting valuable time. This saves you time because it forces you to plan and act before recording, not reactively and inefficiently throughout the process.

We’re going to go with the second route today, but everyone’s workflow is different so feel free to experiment. If you’re looking to get a bit more out of this versatile DAW — how to compose, record, edit, mix, add effects, and develop shortcuts and personalized methods in the process — definitely check out Soundfly’s mentored online course, Intro to Making Music in Logic Pro X. Otherwise, let’s get started!

Music charity organizations

Lastly, for the television-savvy listener, the sort-of-famous theme music to the sort-of-famous ’90s sitcom, Doogie Howser, M.D. (written by Mike Post) can also serve as a handy reminder of the descending octave interval. Bop along with the synth at 0:00.

Dean Olivet received a Music BA in Duluth, MN, but he’s more proud of his French Horn Trophy, Jug Band Trophy, and his plaque that reads “Best Musical Act at the Minnesota Renaissance Festival.” He has fun putting out recordings of his music, but these days he finds making videos about other people’s music to be just as fun. He keeps a record of his guitar curriculum online for a quick reference when he spaces out and can’t think of anything to teach his students.

The internet is horrible at getting us outdoors, but it’s great at connecting likeminded collaborators all over the world. Here are 7 apps to do just that!

“The Montreal-based nonprofit Yellow Bird Project has worked with an amazing range of indie rock musicians over the years to create unique T-shirt designs that benefit an array of charities. This first ever indie rock coloring book is a fitting tribute to the DIY spirit of the bands, featuring witty, hand-illustrated activity pages from artist Andy J. Miller. Music fans can keep themselves out of trouble for hours with mazes, connect-the-dot games, and coloring pages for the Shins, Devendra Banhart, Rilo Kiley, the National, and more than 20 artists. With all royalties going to charity, The Indie Rock Coloring Book is sure to warm even the coolest of hipster hearts.”

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Share your goals with us and we’ll find a course for you, or create a custom mentorship session with a pro musician, engineer, educator, or music industry veteran, to help you achieve them. 

25 greatest rappers of all time

Raven: Alicia is just a special student. She comes to songwriting with a bright and unique voice, crafting lyrics that are conversational yet biting. As a student, she is diligent and hard-working. She receives feedback with grace and uses it as a means to enhancing her writing. I can’t say enough good things about her!

Here’s a handy piece of advice from pro audio engineer Joe Lambert. This video appears in Soundfly’s mentored online course, Faders Up I: Modern Mix Techniques.

You can hear how popular this song really was in Live at the Apollo by listening to how bonkers the crowd goes during that track. But while their faith may have been restored, they still didn’t see Brown as anything more than a single artist, inconsistent at best.

My next move was to warp out a human performance over my beats to hear what it would sound like. I tried both the Wasser and Poppen, and the Poppen sounded cooler. I did continual A/B comparisons with the MIDI version to line everything up by ear.

When I was first asked to analyze a pop tune, I felt it was my Canadian duty to avoid Justin Bieber’s tune “Sorry” (which a real Canadian would have pronounced “SORE-ee” rather than “SAW-ree”). However, I live with a semi-secret Belieber, so the song was hard to avoid, and it turns out there’s actually something pretty harmonically hip going on under Justin’s dulcet tones.